Bobcat found on Snow Canyon Parkway

A dead bobcat is found in the road on Snow Canyon Parkway, St. George, Utah, Sept. 23, 2016 | Image courtesy of Tawny Holmquist, St. George News

ST. GEORGE — After taking an apparent break from its nocturnal routine, a bobcat met an untimely end after wandering into dangerous territory during daylight hours.

A dead bobcat is found in the road on Snow Canyon Parkway, St. George, Utah, Sept. 23, 2016 | Image courtesy of Tawny Holmquist, St. George News
A dead bobcat is found in the road on Snow Canyon Parkway, St. George, Utah, Sept. 23, 2016 | Image courtesy of Tawny Holmquist, St. George News

Tawny Holmquist and her family were driving on Snow Canyon Parkway near the Entrada development at approximately 7 p.m. Friday when they noticed the dead animal in the road.

“We decided to move it off the road a little bit because people were just like running it over,” Holmquist said.

Several other motorists stopped to look at the animal.

Holmquist called St. George Police dispatch hoping to get the carcass picked up so it wouldn’t remain vulnerable on the side of the road.

The animal appeared to be about the size of a 90-pound dog, Holmquist said.

“Multiple of my friends told me they had been seeing it in the middle of the day and early in the morning as well while kids are walking to school,” Holmquist said of an earlier sighting of a live animal matching the description of the dead bobcat.

“It made me a little nervous because we have two dogs and two toddlers.”

Bobcats are known to show up in residential areas on occasion, said Clint Mecham, predator specialist for the Division of Wildlife Resources.

Bobcat in a tree, Utah, July 13, 2012 | Photo courtesy of Gary Kramer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, St. George News
Bobcat in a tree, Utah, July 13, 2012 | Photo courtesy of Gary Kramer and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, St. George News

“Bobcats, they’re really quite common. We have a real healthy bobcat population,” Mecham said.

Bobcat sightings are not uncommon, he said, and they show up often near food sources, including locations where small animals such as rabbits and squirrels can be found.

“Typically they’re quite secretive — like a mountain lion. Most of their movements are nocturnal.”

Sightings of big cats should be reported to the Division of Wildlife Resources, Mecham said. The division has experts available who can respond with tranquilizers and return the animal to its mountain habitat.

Although most big cats are fearful of people, if one appears to be stalking or tracking a person, Mecham advises the following:

  • Do not approach the animal.
  • Do not run.
  • Make noise.
  • Make yourself look as big as possible.
  • Throw rocks or sticks at the animal.
  • Do not turn your back to the animal.

Resources:

Email: jwitham@stgnews.com

Twitter: @STGnews

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2016, all rights reserved.

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8 Comments

  • Common Sense September 30, 2016 at 7:13 am

    Poor Kitty.

  • .... September 30, 2016 at 8:22 am

    My condolences to the family. Praise the Lord !

  • Ron September 30, 2016 at 9:11 am

    #BOBCATLIVESMATTER

  • ladybugavenger September 30, 2016 at 9:34 am

    Bob! Is that you? LOL

  • .... September 30, 2016 at 1:40 pm

    Well looks liked we need to install a cat x-ing sign

    • Real Life September 30, 2016 at 9:33 pm

      Maybe we can get a medicated loser crossing installed by your trailer park.

      • .... October 1, 2016 at 11:20 am

        God bless you my fellow brethren

  • Lance Haynie October 1, 2016 at 8:29 pm

    That’s one big cat, a little too close to home for me. I didn’t realize they were “quite common” is the Snow Canyon area.

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