Belgian jihadi ID’d as mastermind of Paris attacks

This undated image made available in the Islamic State's English-language magazine Dabiq, shows Abdelhamid Abaaoud. Abaaoud, the child of Moroccan immigrants who grew up in the Belgian capital’s Molenbeek-Saint-Jean neighborhood, was identified by French authorities on Monday Nov. 16, 2015, as the presumed mastermind of the terror attacks last Friday in Paris that killed over a hundred people and injured hundreds more, location and date unknown | Militant Photo via AP, St. George News

BRUSSELS (AP) — Once a happy-go-lucky student at one of Brussels’ most prestigious high schools, Saint-Pierre d’Uccle, Abdelhamid Abaaoud morphed into Belgium’s most notorious jihadi, a zealot so devoted to the cause of holy war that he recruited his 13-year-old brother to join him in Syria.

This undated image taken from a Militant Website on Monday Nov. 16, 2015 showing Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. A French official says Abdelhamid Abaaoud is the suspected mastermind of the Paris attacks was also linked to thwarted train and church attacks, location and date unknown | Militant video via AP, St. George News
This undated image taken from a Militant Website on Monday Nov. 16, 2015 showing Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. A French official says Abdelhamid Abaaoud is the suspected mastermind of the Paris attacks was also linked to thwarted train and church attacks, location and date unknown | Photo from militant video via AP, St. George News

The child of Moroccan immigrants who grew up in the Belgian capital’s scruffy and multiethnic Molenbeek-Saint-Jean neighborhood, the fugitive, in his late 20s, was identified by French authorities on Monday as the presumed mastermind of the attacks last Friday in Paris that killed 129 people and injured hundreds.

What’s more, one French official with direct knowledge of the investigation told The Associated Press that Abaaoud is believed to have links to earlier terror attacks that were thwarted: one against a Paris-bound high-speed train that was foiled by three young Americans in August, and the other against a church in the French capital’s suburbs.

The official wasn’t authorized to make public comments on the subject and spoke on condition of anonymity.

“All my life, I have seen the blood of Muslims flow,” Abaaoud said in a video made public in 2014. “I pray that Allah will break the backs of those who oppose him, his soldiers and his admirers, and that he will exterminate them.”

Belgian authorities suspect him of also helping organize and finance a terror cell in the eastern city of Verviers that was broken up in an armed police raid on Jan. 15, in which two of his presumed accomplices were killed.

The following month, Abaaoud was quoted by the Islamic State group’s English-language magazine, Dabiq, as saying that he had secretly returned to Belgium to lead the terror cell and then escaped to Syria in the aftermath of the raid despite having his picture broadcast across the news.

“I was even stopped by an officer who contemplated me so as to compare me to the picture, but he let me go, as he did not see the resemblance!” Abaaoud boasted.

There was no official comment from the Belgian federal prosecutor’s office about Abaaoud’s reported role in the Paris attacks. Belgian police over the weekend announced the arrest of three suspects in Molenbeek, his old neighborhood, and were carrying out numerous searches there Monday.

The hardscrabble area in the west of Brussels has long been considered a focal point of Islamic radicalism and recruitment of foreign fighters to go to Iraq and Syria.

Abaaoud’s image became grimmer after independent journalists Etienne Huver and Guillaume Lhotellier, visiting the Turkish-Syrian frontier, obtained photos and video last year of Abaaoud’s exploits across Syria. The material included footage of him and his friends loading a pickup truck and a makeshift trailer with a mound of bloodied corpses.

Before driving off, a grinning Abaaoud tells the camera: “Before we towed jet skis, motorcycles, quad bikes, big trailers filled with gifts for vacation in Morocco. Now, thank God, following God’s path, we’re towing apostates, infidels who are fighting us.”

Huver told The Associated Press Monday the video was too fragmentary to say much about Abaaoud’s character, but that he detected some signs the Belgian was moving into a leadership role.

“On the one hand I’m surprised,” Huver said of Abaaoud’s prominence. “On the other hand, I saw that there were beginnings of something . You can see that he’s giving orders. You can feel a charismatic guy who’s going up in the world … You can see a combatant who’s ready to climb the ranks.”

French authorities didn’t immediately disclose the nature of the Belgian jihadi’s purported connection to a pair of foiled terrorism incidents earlier this year in France.

On Aug. 21, a heavily-armed passenger who boarded an Amsterdam-to-Paris Thalys high-speed train at Brussels opened fire in a train car before being overpowered by three Americans, two of them off-duty members of the U.S. armed forces.

French media reported the gunman in the abortive attack, Ayoub El Khazzani, 25, from Morocco, may have had ties to groups being investigated by counter-terrorism officials in Belgium.

Belgian authorities launched an investigation into his possible accomplices. El Khazzani has been jailed in France on various charges including attempted murder in connection with terrorism and participation in a terror conspiracy.

On April 19, French authorities said they thwarted a plot to attack a church in the Paris suburb of Villejuif after the alleged perpetrator apparently shot himself in the leg and called police.

Arriving officers traced the blood to the car of Sid Ahmed Ghlam, in which they found an arsenal of weapons and indications he was planning to storm a church later in the day.

French authorities have said the plot was masterminded from Syria.

Story by RAPHAEL SATTER and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, Associated Press. Raphael Satter reported from Paris. Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed to this report.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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2 Comments

  • fun bag November 16, 2015 at 10:44 am

    is that an amercan HUMV? they should write a letter to our dearest pres King Bush II thanking him for all the free military supplies…

    • Brian November 16, 2015 at 12:53 pm

      Actually they should thank obama and his cronies when they ordered retreated without taking anything with them, and after giving the enemy advanced notice that we were going to retreat, and by creating a complete power vacuum in the region (Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Egypt) that led to the creation and rise of ISIS. Then they brilliantly supplied people with known radical ties with all sorts of weapons, arms, and equipment. Though I agree, bush and his cronies are far from blameless.

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