Grand Canyon National Park prepares for multiday shutdown of Trans-canyon Pipeline

This 2014 file photo shows park personnel assessing damage from a split in a section of the Trans-canyon Waterline, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona | Photo courtesy of National Park Service , St. George News

GRAND CANYON, Ariz. — Grand Canyon National Park is in the process of replacing a portion of the Trans-canyon Pipeline at Phantom Ranch. As part of the construction process, the TCP will be turned off to allow crews to connect the new portions of the pipeline to the existing pipeline.

Water spraying from break in exposed section of Trans-canyon Waterline - after flash flood event.   Bright Angel Creek visible on right. (In this area, the pipeline was buried below the surface of the trail.)  Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, Jan. 2, 2014 | Photo courtesy of National Park Service , St. George News
Water spraying from break in exposed section of Trans-canyon Waterline – after flash flood event. Bright Angel Creek visible on right. (In this area, the pipeline was buried below the surface of the trail.)
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, Jan. 2, 2014 | Photo courtesy of National Park Service , St. George News

The TCP shutdown will begin Sunday and is anticipated to last through the end of the week. For safety purposes, crews must also turn off the power to Phantom Ranch Monday.

Phantom Ranch will begin water conservation measures Sunday that will last the duration of the project, but drinking water will continue to be available. Drinking water will be unavailable at Bright Angel and Cottonwood campgrounds, Roaring Springs and Manzanita Rest Area (formerly Pumphouse Residence) during the shutdown. Day hikers and backpackers should be prepared to carry all drinking water or be able to treat creek water for drinking.

Grand Canyon National Park has a large and complex water utility system that provides water to close to 5 million annual visitors in addition to about 2,500 residents who live within the park. Visitors and residents on the South and North rims will still have access to water during the planned TCP shutdown via a water storage system. However, during the shutdown, visitors and residents are encouraged to practice basic water conservation measures.

Water conservation can be as simple as turning off the water while you brush your teeth or shave, taking shorter showers, not watering lawns or washing cars and filling the sink with water while washing dishes.

Because of the complexity of the TCP replacement project, at least one more multiday TCP shutdown is anticipated this year. At this time, there is no date set for that shutdown.

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