Hatch decries Roe v. Wade during Senate floor speech

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WASHINGTON, D.C. – Sen. Orrin Hatch spoke on the Senate floor Thursday regarding the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision.

A press statement released by Hatch’s office Thursday referred to Roe v. Wade as having a “tragic legacy.”

Among his comments to the Senate, Hatch said:

Two nights ago, in his State of the Union Address, President Obama spoke about the values that are at stake in the public policy choices we must make. Is there any value more important than life itself? He spoke about expanding opportunities for individuals, but the first opportunity that must be secured is the opportunity for life itself. For many, the right to abortion is a symbol of progress.  However, the idea that an act resulting in killing a living human being should be held up as a step forward, as a light to guide our way strikes me as deeply misguided.  We should instead be deepening the conviction that all human beings have inherent dignity and worth.  That has been and should remain the foundation for our culture, society, and even our politics.

View video of Hatch’s speech here.

Full text of Hatch’s speech as prepared

Mr./Mdm. President, today is the anniversary of a tragedy.  Forty-two years ago today, the Supreme Court announced its creation of a right to abortion for virtually any reason at virtually any time.  The result of that decision is a tragedy for our society, for our culture, and for each precious life lost.

Since even before America’s founding, the law was on a steady march toward protecting human beings before birth.  Through the 19th century, medical professionals and civil rights activists led a movement that succeeded in prohibiting abortion in every state except to save the mother’s life.  America had reached a consensus on the importance of protecting the most vulnerable.

Unfortunately, the Supreme Court swept all of that aside, imposing upon the country a permissive abortion regime that the American people, to this day, have never chosen or accepted.

The debate over the morality, legality, or policy of abortion begins with one inescapable fact.  Every abortion kills a living human being.  Many have tried mightily to avoid, obscure, distract from, or ignore that fact but it will not go away.  Every abortion kills a living human being.  That fact informed President Ronald Reagan when he wrote a moving essay titled Abortion and the Conscience of the Nation in 1983.  He wrote: “We cannot diminish the value of one category of human life – the unborn – without diminishing the value of all human life.”

The real question, President Reagan said, is not about when human life begins but about the value of human life.  I believe that remains the real question today.

Today, the United States is one of only seven nations in the world to allow abortion into the sixth month of pregnancy and beyond.  That list of nations includes such champions of human rights as China and North Korea.  Yet the United States in 1948 voted in favor of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes in its preamble the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of “all members of the human family.”  Article 3 of the declaration states that “everyone has the right to life.”

Words such as universal and inherent and all are unambiguous and clear.  Our embrace of the inherent dignity and worth of all human beings in 1948 stands in jarring contrast to the Supreme Court’s decision in Roe just 25 years later that the life of any human being may be ended before birth.

The Supreme Court might have thought in 1973 that it was settling the abortion issue.  By 1992, however, the Court conceded that the rules it created in Roe simply did not work and issued revised regulations in a case titled Planned Parenthood v. Casey.  The Court said that the contending sides in the abortion controversy should “end their national division by accepting a common mandate rooted in the Constitution.”

National division on any issue, let alone one so profound as the taking and the value of human life, will not end simply because the Supreme Court says so.  The division over abortion not only continues, but has remained largely unchanged even after dozens of Supreme Court decisions and four decades of insisting that abortion is a constitutional right.  The Supreme Court can render opinions on constitutionality, but it is limited in its ability to forge lasting consensus—that is the provenance of our great deliberative bodies where the people are truly represented.

More than 70 percent of Americans believe that abortion should be illegal in most or all circumstances.  That figure has not changed in 40 years.  What has changed is that more Americans today identify themselves as pro-life than pro-choice.  Large majorities favor a range of limitations on abortion and last November elected scores of new pro-life legislators at both the state and federal level.

Mr./Mdm. President, we must not avoid the fundamental question of the value of human life, for no question is more important.  Do we still, as we once did, believe that every human being has inherent dignity and worth?  Two nights ago, in his State of the Union Address, President Obama spoke about the values that are at stake in the public policy choices we must make.  Is there any value more important than life itself?  He spoke about expanding opportunities for individuals, but the first opportunity that must be secured is the opportunity for life itself.

For many, the right to abortion is a symbol of progress.  However, the idea that an act resulting in killing a living human being should be held up as a step forward, as a light to guide our way strikes me as deeply misguided.  We should instead be deepening the conviction that all human beings have inherent dignity and worth.  That has been and should remain the foundation for our culture, society, and even our politics.

In his 1983 essay, President Reagan wrote that “we cannot survive as a free nation when some men decide that others are not fit to live and should be abandoned to abortion.”  Today’s tragic anniversary is a reminder of how our nation’s survival depends on respecting the essential dignity and worth of every individual. Resting in the balance is how we ultimately define who we are as a people and what we strive to be as a nation.

Submitted by the Offices of Sen. Orrin Hatch

Ed. note: Updated to include the full text of Hatch’s remarks and a link to video of the speech.

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25 Comments

  • Roy J January 22, 2015 at 5:34 pm

    Whoa! Now I would like to read the rest of those comments! Hey Joyce, can you provide a link?

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic January 22, 2015 at 6:08 pm

      You bet, Roy J. I’ve added the full text of the speech as prepared and a video link of the speech delivered.
      Updated 6:05 p.m. And thank you for the prompt, Roy.
      Joyce
      EIC

      • Roy J January 22, 2015 at 6:11 pm

        Thank you, Joyce. I appreciate!

  • Just Curious January 22, 2015 at 5:38 pm

    When you are able to get pregnant, Mr. Hatch, you can have your say on abortion. Until that time, please shut up and keep your opinion to yourself. This is a matter for women and only women to decide.

    • Roy J January 22, 2015 at 6:47 pm

      I wonder what your reasoning for your position might be, JUST CURIOUS.

      • Just Curious January 22, 2015 at 9:11 pm

        You’re kidding, right?

    • khalidaqrab January 23, 2015 at 7:51 am

      You realize that “Jane Roe” is now opposed the decision that bears her name.

      • Just Curious January 23, 2015 at 4:46 pm

        This is her choice.

    • Brian January 23, 2015 at 2:29 pm

      So what you’re really saying is that no man should ever have to pay child support? And women are responsible for every bad thing that has ever happened on this planet? If women get 100% of the say about the fate of a child, because she is carrying it during the pregnancy, then women should get the other side of that coin, too. Of course I don’t believe this, I’m just using it to illustrate the absolute absurdity of your position. I completely disagree with your position that a man has no say in the fate and life of the child he helped create (50 / 50).

      • Just Curious January 24, 2015 at 10:49 am

        You should get out more Brian and listen to something other than talk radio. If you did, you’d understand that in many many cases, it is the man who encourages the abortion because HE doesn’t want the child and is even willing to pay for it. Refuses to take any responsibility for the child. Surely, you’ve heard of situations like this. Oh, maybe not in Utah where every man who impregnates a woman is a fine upstanding fellow who happily marries her and supports his little family. No trace of deadbeat dads around here or guys who just leave the woman holding the bag. Nope. None. Affairs, yes. But no bad guys…

    • Koolaid January 23, 2015 at 5:27 pm

      Pharmaceutical companies that contribute to his campaign coffers and to his Utah family organization manufacture contraceptives and morning after pills.

  • tight magic undies January 22, 2015 at 7:21 pm

    It really is time for this guy to go. He is the perfect example of why we need term limits.

    • tight magic undies January 22, 2015 at 7:28 pm

      In fact someone should check his pulse to make sure he is actually still alive.

      • bully January 22, 2015 at 9:09 pm

        Tight Magic Undies,, Go get____ Pregant.

  • Hiker January 22, 2015 at 9:50 pm

    Why do people continue to debate a decision the Supreme Court made decades ago? The issue has already been decided! The Supreme Court is not influenced by the opinions of others.

    • Big Guy January 23, 2015 at 7:28 am

      Except on Obamacare where John Roberts explained his otherwise inexplicable vote that the “mandate” was not a tax. He said he didn’t want to overturn the results of the 2008 election and what the Democrat Congress enacted or words to that effect. The Supreme Court reads the newspapers.

    • Just Curious January 23, 2015 at 8:38 am

      Exactly right.

  • Dilbert January 22, 2015 at 9:54 pm

    Where are all these people once a child is born? Take care of their needs (food, shelter, clothing, education, health care, etc.) And stop worrying about contraception, end of discussion.

  • koolaid January 22, 2015 at 11:06 pm

    Just imagine if Hatch had been aborted.

  • Just Curious January 23, 2015 at 8:40 am

    My comment was in response to Hiker and not Big Guy. I wish this were a better commenting page so the responses ended up where they were intended.

  • sagemoon January 23, 2015 at 8:42 am

    Mr. Hatch, your values and my values do not match. Please get your nose out of my business! Formaldehyde huffing blow hard.

    • One For The Rosd January 24, 2015 at 1:57 am

      Well heck sage I don’t need to comment you already did that for me. LOL

  • IN THE GAME January 23, 2015 at 9:56 am

    The Roe v Wade decision came a little too late for grandpa Hatch’s mommy… Poor little thing.

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