Farm Field Days presents agricultural learning to fourth graders

FFA leaders teach fourth graders from Washington County Schools about agriculture at Staheli Farm, Washington, Utah, Oct. 8, 2014 | Photo by Holly Coombs, St. George News

WASHINGTON CITY — About 20 fourth grade classes from around Washington County participated in a Farm Field Days event at Staheli Farms Tuesday through Thursday.

An event set to teach the students about the necessary uses of livestock, bees, beef, beef byproducts, soils and pollination was presented by the 4-H Youth Development Organization and the Future Farmers of America, Utah State University Extension Assistant Professor Paul Hill said.

A fourth grader holds a chicken during a Farm Field Day field trip to Staheli Farm, Washington, Utah, Oct. 8, 2014 | Photo by Holly Coombs, St. George News
A fourth grader holds a chicken during a Farm Field Day field trip to Staheli Farm, Washington, Utah, Oct. 8, 2014 | Photo by Holly Coombs, St. George News

“It began when about a dozen concerned citizens, government agencies, farmers, and educators came together to address the disconnection youth have from agriculture’s affect on their daily lives,” Hill said. “The disconnect is worse now than it was 19 years ago because less and less people are involved in the business of food, fuel, and fiber.”

Students experience first-hand the affect agriculture has on their daily lives and helps them appreciate what they have, he said.

The fourth graders were divided into six groups for the six stations taught by FFA leaders. The students learned about lanolin, lotions, and other biproducts that are developed through the use of sheep.

“We use the agriculture curriculum from the classroom to teach the students,” Hill said.

One station was a presentation of how long it takes to make a pizza. Because the development of pineapple and other products used to make a pizza takes time – the estimate was that it takes six years to make a pizza.

Beekeeper Mike Taylor showed the students the importance of tending to bees. Other FFA leaders taught about how soil is useful for the obtaining of food and clothing, as well as the nutrients that can be obtained from cows.

Bee Keeper Mike Taylor teaches fourth graders about the use of bees at a Farm Field Days education trip, Washington, Utah, Oct. 8, 2014 | Photo by Holly Coombs, St. George News
Bee Keeper Mike Taylor teaches fourth graders about the use of bees at a Farm Field Days education trip, Washington, Utah, Oct. 8, 2014 | Photo by Holly Coombs, St. George News

“Zinc helps me think, iron helps my blood, and protein helps my muscles,” was a saying the FFA leaders taught the students regarding the use of cows.

On Wednesday, Panorama Elementary School, Sandstone Elementary School, East Elementary School, and Heritage Elementary School attended the Farm Field Day.

Sandstone Elementary School Fourth Grade Teacher Howard Nielsen said the students have been coming for about 10 years to the field trip.

“This trip gets the kids familiar with farming, which is not something they see much of,” Nielsen said. “They get to see where things come from that they use all the time.”

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1 Comment

  • Matthew Sevald October 10, 2014 at 7:53 am

    This is cool. I’d like to see something more permanent grow from this instead of that “zoo” idea being tossed around. This is practical and already has roots which can be developed.

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