Agree, disagree; council deals with public works, water, service

Delaying water impact fees for community gardens, this one at 900 West and 360 South, was a point of discussion for the Hurricane City Council Thursday, August 7, 2014 | Photo by Reuben Wadsworth, St. George News

HURRICANE – With two of its members absent, the Hurricane City Council had a light agenda Thursday night that focused mainly on public works, with acknowledgement given to citizen protest for recent police response to a motorcycle escort given to a funeral procession through the city.

Flooding in the Angell Heights Estates neighborhood, Hurricane, Utah, Sept 11, 2013 | Photo by Dave Amodt, St. George News
Flooding in the Angell Heights Estates neighborhood, Hurricane, Utah, Sept 11, 2013 | Photo by Dave Amodt, St. George News

Flood control

The council discussed an interlocal agreement regarding flood control – its membership in the newly formed Washington County Flood Control Authority. City Engineer Arthur LeBaron said that Hurricane is not a voting member of the organization while City Manager Clark Fawcett said most of its projects are in Ivins and Santa Clara. Even without primary status, it is still beneficial for Hurricane to be a part of the authority to “piggyback on what other cities have done” and be apprised as to what’s going on in the county to mitigate flooding.

With only three council members in attendance, the vote to approve the agreement had to be unanimous and Councilwoman Pam Humphries voted no, initially.

After Humphries’ negative vote, LeBaron asked what concerned her. She said she questions how the agreement would benefit Hurricane, saying flooding that might happen in Hurricane is not connected to Santa Clara and Ivins. Municipalities must plan regionally and implement locally, LeBaron said, explaining that the Flood Control Authority is a good public works plan and if Hurricane does not agree to it, even though it is not a primary member, it would put a wrench in it, reminding Humphries that it does not cost the city or its residents anything to be a member.

LeBaron’s explanations helped Humphries acquiesce.

However, she said, “my yes has a little side of no.”

Delaying water impact fees for community gardens, this one at 900 West and 360 South, was a point of discussion for the Hurricane City Council Thursday, August 7, 2014 | Photo by Reuben Wadsworth, St. George News
Delaying water impact fees for community gardens, this one at 900 West and 360 South, was a point of discussion for the Hurricane City Council Thursday, August 7, 2014 | Photo by Reuben Wadsworth, St. George News

Water impact fees – community gardens

The council discussed an agreement requested by the Healthy Dixie Council and presented by Lebaron that would delay water impact fees for community gardens. In such cases, LeBaron said, the landowner would enter an agreement to pay to connect to water and the impact fees would be delayed if the plot would become a community garden.

Every proposal should be reviewed and there should be a limit on the amount of community gardens approved, Fawcett said. Mayor John Bramall agreed, saying that the City Council should approve every request, which must be accompanied with real interest and responsibility.

Humphries said the agreement must include a definition of a community garden, asking if the produce from such a plot could be taken to market.

That is not the definition of a community garden, LeBaron said. It is a cooperative in which participants pay a fee to cover costs for use of a plot.

Humphries said she would like to see the definition of a community garden appear on the agreement and  that the item should be brought on one of the next council meeting agendas with a clear definition.

Improvement project, 600 North

The council approved a $217,000 contract for construction engineering services with Civil Science for the 600 North improvement project, which Bramall called a no-brainer.

“We need to go on to the next step,” he said

The council mentioned that the city would form a committee of residents affected by the project to let the city know how communication from the contractors about road closures and other issues is going.

Groundbreaking on the project is slated for this fall.

Statewide mutual aid

Entering into the Statewide Mutual Aid Interlocal Agreement for Public Works was considered and approved. Hurricane City Public Works Director Mike Vercimak said the agreement is an attempt to make aid within the state “a little more global.”

The agreement will help Hurricane City be better prepared for emergencies in the event of disaster, Bramall said, and help preserve infrastructure. The council approved the agreement with little discussion.

Hurricane Police speak to bikers after they are stopped. Hurricane City, Utah. July 26, 2014 | Photo provided by  Katie Mandel.
Hurricane Police speak to bikers after they are stopped. Hurricane City, Utah. July 26, 2014 | Photo provided by Katie Mandel.

Water restrictions

The council also reminded citizens of the current watering restrictions between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. except for large agricultural and recreational properties which cannot be adequately served within that time frame.

Police intervention in funeral procession

During the public forum, citizen Stephen Meyer, a member of the American Legion post 100, expressed his disappointment with the actions of two Hurricane policemen concerning a recent motorcycle funeral procession he rode in from St. George to Virgin. There were 80 motorcycles in the procession and the policemen stopped the last 15, he said. The policemen, in their zeal to pull the motorcycles over, almost caused an accident, did not show compassion, did not offer to escort the procession and failed to explain the violation, he said.


See full story here: Police stop motorcycle pack during funeral procession

In response to Meyer’s disapproval of the policemen’s actions, Bramall said he met with the Police Department about the incident and assured Meyer the police would do better in the future in similar situations.

“Most of our officers would have assisted,” Bramall said.

Related posts

Email: rwadsworth@stgnews.com

Twitter: @STGnews

Copyright St. George News, StGeorgeUtah.com Inc., 2014, all rights reserved

 

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4 Comments

  • Just an Old Man August 8, 2014 at 8:44 am

    “Where is the Beef.” In this case where is the PERMIT. I keep hearing of a permit, where is the permit. Time to show the permit or realize the bikers were breaking the law. Stephen Meyer get the permit and have it posted on the St George News for all to see.

  • Harold August 8, 2014 at 7:00 pm

    There is no permit. The state and the city does not give out permits for people to break the law.

  • Dunce August 9, 2014 at 9:52 am

    The permit would have to come from UDOT and they don’t give permits to shut down state highways for funerals. Did you see the video these guys posted. Outright reckless and dangerous behavior. The police should be applauded for attempting to stop this Mayhem. Mr Meyers needs to do something productive. Don’t use the american legion for you own police hating purposes. The rest of us members don’t agree with what you are saying and support the police department.

  • My Evil Twin August 9, 2014 at 12:56 pm

    If Mayor Bramall, and for that matter, the Hurricane Police Chief had a set of huevos, they would tell Meyer to go to the beach and pound sand up his rear end. The cops did what they are being paid to do. Namely, enforce the law and try to keep motorists as safe as possible.
    I’m sure if these folks had contacted the various LE agencies with a couple of days notice, they would have had not only cooperation, but very likely escorts. But no, they were to lazy or dumb to do that, and now they are trying to make the cops out to be the bad guys.
    It really frosts me to see both the chief and the mayor not stand up for their troops.

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