Crews respond to semitrailer leaking fuel on I-15 near ‘Boilers’ warm springs

Crews from several agencies respond to address a fuel leak from a semitrailer with a fractured fuel tank on Interstate 15 near mile marker 11, Washington County, Utah, April 20, 2016| Photo by Cody Blowers, St. George News

WASHINGTON CITY — A broken drive line punctured the fuel tank of a semitractor-trailer on Interstate 15 near mile marker 11 Wednesday, causing fuel to spew out onto the Interstate until emergency workers stopped and diverted the flow away from nearby Washington County Warm Springs, also known as the Boilers.

Just after 4:30 p.m. emergency personnel were dispatched to mile marker 11 on Interstate 15 southbound, after the St. George Communications Center received report of “gas” – fuel – leaking from a semitrailer.

Gas tank leaking fuel after rupturing from drive line breakage, Interstate 15, Utah, Apr. 20, 2016| Photo by Cody Blowers, St. George News
Gas tank leaking fuel after rupturing from drive line breakage on a semitractor-trailer on Interstate 15 near mile marker 11, Washington County, Utah, April 20, 2016| Photo by Cody Blowers, St. George News

When officers arrived, Utah Highway Patrol Sgt. Larry Mowers said, they found the semi pulled off to the side of the freeway with the fuel leaking from one of the tanks of the truck located on the passenger side.

The leak was caused by a drive line that fractured while the truck was in motion, sending metal through the fuel tank and puncturing it.

The damage left a rupture that allowed diesel fuel to spray from the tank onto the Interstate, initiating the call to 911.

Emergency personnel also responded and attempted to contain the leaking fuel, with attention given to keeping it from draining into the nearby Washington Warm Springs, also known as the Boilers, a unique nature sanctuary.

Site of the Warm Springs, also known as “the Boilers,” Washington City, Utah, June 1, 2015 | Photo by Sheldon Demke, St. George News
This 2015 photo shows the the Washington County Warm Springs, also known as “the Boilers,” Washington City, Utah, June 1, 2015 | Photo by Sheldon Demke, St. George News

Officers also requested a hazardous materials cleanup as a safety precaution, Mowers said. However, after assessing the amount of fuel that actually leaked it was determined that it wasn’t warranted.

Instead, the local Water Services Department responded and assisted by digging a small trench, which channeled the leaking fuel away from nearby water sources, he said.

Meanwhile, a bulldozer was dispatched to the area and completed the containment, while emergency personnel finished clearing the roadway.

The semitractor-trailer was rendered inoperable after the breakage and subsequent leak, and was towed from the freeway.

No injuries were reported.

The Utah Highway Patrol, Washington Fire Department, Utah Department of Transportation Incident Management Team, and the local Water Services Department responded to the scene.

This report is based on preliminary information provided by law enforcement or other emergency responders and may not contain the full scope of findings.

Ed. CORRECTION April 22: This report initially referred to the leaking fuel and its tank as gasoline and gas; semitractor-trailers use diesel fuel and the characterization has been revised throughout the story and headline.

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Email: cblowers@stgnews.com

Twitter: @STGnews

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2016, all rights reserved.

 

 

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13 Comments

  • St. G April 21, 2016 at 1:03 pm

    Just a small thing: tractor/trailers don’t have gas or gas tanks. Diesel, yes; occasionally propane—which can be a liquid or a gas.

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic April 22, 2016 at 8:50 am

      Small things matter, St. G. So I thank you and have revised the report with this editor’s note: CORRECTION April 22: This report initially referred to the leaking fuel and its tank as gasoline and gas; semitractor-trailers use diesel fuel and the characterization has been revised throughout the story and headline.
      ST. GEORGE NEWS
      Joyce Kuzmanic
      Editor in Chief

  • Proud Rebel April 21, 2016 at 1:03 pm

    Gasoline? Uh no, more like diesel fuel. Big difference in both the fire/explosion hazard and environmental hazard…

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic April 22, 2016 at 8:51 am

      Yes, Proud Reb, I have revised the report with this editor’s note: CORRECTION April 22: This report initially referred to the leaking fuel and its tank as gasoline and gas; semitractor-trailers use diesel fuel and the characterization has been revised throughout the story and headline.
      ST. GEORGE NEWS
      Joyce Kuzmanic
      Editor in Chief

  • Mr. W April 21, 2016 at 4:04 pm

    I hate when my diesel leaks “gas” everywhere!!!! It is just the worst 🙁

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic April 22, 2016 at 8:52 am

      Isn’t it the worst, Mr. W? So are mischaracterizations. I have revised the report with this editor’s note: CORRECTION April 22: This report initially referred to the leaking fuel and its tank as gasoline and gas; semitractor-trailers use diesel fuel and the characterization has been revised throughout the story and headline.
      Thank you!
      ST. GEORGE NEWS
      Joyce Kuzmanic
      Editor in Chief

  • Shane April 21, 2016 at 7:03 pm

    looks like to me that is Diesel not Gasoline.

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic April 22, 2016 at 8:53 am

      Yes, yes, Shane. Thank you – I have revised the report with this editor’s note: CORRECTION April 22: This report initially referred to the leaking fuel and its tank as gasoline and gas; semitractor-trailers use diesel fuel and the characterization has been revised throughout the story and headline.
      ST. GEORGE NEWS
      Joyce Kuzmanic
      Editor in Chief

  • Ronnie Keith April 21, 2016 at 11:54 pm

    Semi’s run on diesel fule, not gasoline.

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic April 22, 2016 at 8:54 am

      They do, Ronnie, they do. I have revised the report with this editor’s note: CORRECTION April 22: This report initially referred to the leaking fuel and its tank as gasoline and gas; semitractor-trailers use diesel fuel and the characterization has been revised throughout the story and headline.
      ST. GEORGE NEWS
      Joyce Kuzmanic
      Editor in Chief

  • Common Sense April 22, 2016 at 9:28 am

    So….they just stood around and watched it leak out? Is there a reason why no attempt appeared to be made to collect leaking fluid in some kind of container or is it better to just let it soak into the ground?

  • .... April 22, 2016 at 1:14 pm

    Semi’so run on tires not diesel. Semi’so run off of diesel and run on tires

    • RealMcCoy April 23, 2016 at 12:14 pm

      You must be using the same Google Translate program the other woman used earlier.
      Is “semi’so'” a word you use often in your house?
      Did you go Nell on us, dotboy?

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