Truck plows through wall on Hidden Valley Drive

Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

ST. GEORGE – A truck crashed through a brick wall near the intersection of Hidden Valley Drive and Price Hills Drive in St. George Thursday night leaving all involved shaken, yet without serious injury.

St. George Police Sgt. Sam Despain said a late model pickup truck was traveling on Hidden Valley Drive when the driver somehow became distracted, causing the truck to crash into a brick wall on the south side of the road. The crash was reported to the St. George Communications Center at 11:45 p.m.

Despain said there were four occupants in the truck including the driver, all of whom he described as teens. While they were shaken up by the crash and sustained some cuts and bruises, he said none of them required transport to the hospital.

Speed is considered to be one of the factors involved in the crash, Despain said. He was unable to confirm the nature of distraction that led to the truck turning into a last-minute bulldozer.

The truck was totaled and had to be towed from the location. No other vehicles were involved in the incident and there were no corollary injuries to anyone.

Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News
Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News
Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News
Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News
Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News
Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

Email: mkessler@stgnews.com

Twitter: @MoriKessler

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2013, all rights reserved.

Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News
Gap left in a wall on Hidden Valley Drive near Price Hills Drive after a truck plowed though it, St. George, Utah, June 28, 2013 | Photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

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5 Comments

  • Roy J June 28, 2013 at 5:06 pm

    I could be wrong, but I don’t think that is how you use the word corollary. Unless you mean that since there were no other vehicles involved in the incident, it followed as a natural consequence that there were no other injuries, which would stillonly be a corollary non sequitur. hem. It is hot today.

    • Joyce Kuzmanic Joyce Kuzmanic June 28, 2013 at 6:27 pm

      Aha! We like vocabulary builders. But Roy J, this one stands. 😀
      “Corollary,” as an adjective, has the meaning “associated,” which is what we intended here.
      There were no associated injuries.
      JK, EIC

  • Roy J June 28, 2013 at 6:41 pm

    Hmm, I am squirming through the online dictionaries, and all I find for ‘corollary’ as ‘associated’ is in the Oxford Dictionary which is this:

    adjective
    forming a proposition that follows from one already proved.
    •associated; supplementary.

    Well, that goes in the logbook along with that one time I saw Shakespeare use this word. Woot!

  • Doug June 29, 2013 at 7:51 am

    I have to go with Roy J on this one. Corollary is generally a noun. Its use as “associated” is a very narrow definition that most dictionaries do not support.

  • Dan Lester June 29, 2013 at 10:22 am

    This retired professor judges Joyce and Mori the winners on this one. They are correct. Consider your vocabularies expanded, Doug and Roy.

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