Prescribed burns in Grand Canyon; visitors, take note and travel with caution

GRAND CANYON, Ariz. – Fire managers at the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument and Grand Canyon National Park  are planning to conduct prescribed burns through the fall.

Burns at Grand Canyon-Parashant will mostly take place near Mount Dellenbaugh. The Pleasant Valley West (covering 212 acres) and Halfway (covering 200 acres) fires were ignited in late September. The Pine Valley East (1,214 acres), Twin Springs Boundary (623 acres) and Pine Valley Meadow (96 acres) fires are scheduled for October, weather and fuel conditions permitting.

In Grand Canyon National Park, burns will take place in three main areas over the next 30 days: Near the North Rim employee housing area, along the northern park boundary west of the entrance station and along the W1 road west of the Basin.

While the burns are ongoing, visitors to these areas may see fire vehicles and personnel, and may see open flames or smell smoke. Though no road closures are anticipated, smoke could reduce visibility. Please use caution when traveling.

Prescribed burns are intended to decrease future wildfire risk and protect cultural and natural resources. The burning will also reduce the density of juniper and brush species, promoting conditions that allow for growth of native grasses and forbs, thus increasing native plant diversity.

Prior to ignition, prescribed burns must meet certain weather-related and environmental factors. National Park Service staff will monitor fire activity and smoke emissions will be managed in accordance with Arizona Department of Environmental Quality regulations.

For more information on fire management in the Grand Canyon National Park, visit their website.

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